Saturday, February 19, 2011

Waiting for Superman

Sorry, no downloads in this post.

I'm just watching Waiting for Superman.

Making me think about what I can do to be better, how I can make a difference.

Have you seen it?

What were your thoughts?

How are you making a difference?

What can we do together? 

18 comments:

According to Ashley said...

It's in my Netflix queue! My principal told us about it and I was intrigued....

Kinderpond said...

Ha! I am watching it right now lol

mrskilburnkiddos said...

I love your blog so much! Thank you so much for sharing your expertise and ideas with all of us! I'm awarding you with the Stylish Blog award!

Barbara
http://mrskilburnkiddos.wordpress.com/

Rachelle said...

Natalie,
I heard about it on Oprah. I haven't seen it. But what I got from the conversations about it, they don't really talk about the good part about public education. How there are MANY amazing teachers out there, and how there are many successful public schools. Maybe I will rent it this week.

Plants seeds of knowledge...for our future! said...

I'm awarding you the stylish blog award! Please go to my blog to follow instructions.
Jenea
www.seedsofnoledge.blogspot.com

April Brown said...

I wanted to watch it last night on Netflix but was too tired. Perhaps tomorrow when I'm suppose to be doing report cards :-).

Interesting this movie should be coming up in light of what is happening right now with teachers, unions and the government in the USA. I feel your pain. Stay strong! Fight for what you believe in. Don't back down. Your government can cut back in other areas rather than in your pocket book.
A supporter in Canada.

msbrownsgrade2class.blogspot.com

Andi said...

I haven't watched it yet because I deeply oppose Charter Schools. I know I should be open minded, but it is hard. We have four magnet elementary schools in our county and they are such a joke. It isn't the poor underprivileged kids who go there. It's just opposite. They are a total social scene. I've had some of good girlfriends cry for days because their kid didn't get into the magnet school. God forbid, their kid goes to my school. I've helped write some of the curriculums ALL the schools in our county use. They are brainwashed to think it is so much better. One parent even called the regular schools' kids "general population." The magnet schools didn't revive a dying school, it created a divide ( a segregation, if you will) in our county. So, for those reasons, I've been hesitant to watch the film. I'm a public school teacher and proud of it!

Morgan said...

My school went to see it together in the theater. It was ok. It was really lacking a teacher's voice - it had points of view from parents, students, community, legislators, but no teachers. And it did come across as a commercial for charter schools. It made it seem like all the good teachers are at charter schools. I knew what I was getting into though and didn't let it offend me. Actually, it sort of had the opposite effect - I came away thinking, how can I do even more?

Lindsey said...

it looks to depressing!

Lindsey said...

too*

Hi, I'm Harmony said...

It's in my Netflix que...can't wait to see it!

Mrs. Beck

http://mrsbecksgotclass.blogspot.com/

schroederpage said...

I am a public school educator and after reading your posts I am adding this movie to my Netflix. Curious to see...
Love your blog! I visit it ofter:)
Monica
www.theschroederpage.com

Madamsara said...

By far one of the BEST movies ever! Every teacher can relate to it!

Sarah Paul said...

I am passing the Stylish Blogger Award on to you! This link will explain:
http://snippetsbysarah.blogspot.com/

Chantelle said...

I saw the movie and I found it shocking, especially the way that schools find it necessary to do lotteries! I agree with Morgan, towards the end of the film it did seem like a commercial for Charter schools. What I did get out of it is that I want to be a better teacher for whatever school I go into... not one of the "lemons". And if it IS true that in fact charter schools are doing better, then that just means that public school teachers need to prove them wrong. It's sad what the perception of public schools is, and its only getting worse. I do agree however with the statement that they made in the film where they said that the neighborhoods aren't the ones that make the schools bad; but that it is in fact the schools which make the neighborhoods bad. It's very true.

Sharlee said...

I agree with Andi. I haven't seen the movie yet but I know that a lot of teachers are up in arms about it. I am not. I do oppose charter schools and feel that they do create segregation. However, our public schools are very much in need of reform. I think in order to get the best reform for students, the teachers need a little rebellion. I am definitely up for it. And not union rebellion. Rebellion against the system that's not working. Rebellion against scripted curricula.

The Life of a Teacher said...

Hi! I just came across your blog...love your thoughts, ideas, etc.
I actually have not seen Waiting for Superman, but had similar questions arise when I watched Freedom Writer's Diary...How can I make more of a difference (especially for those that don't get a chance)? Would I go so far as to go higher than my principal when not satisfied? It overwhelmed and inspired me all at the same time. I think it's good for us to constantly think and mull over those questions...
K :)

Sarah said...

I just found your blog, and I love it.....I didn't see the movie, but I read the book and the biggest things I learned were that there are good teachers getting hung out to dry either by testing or by their peers who simply don't care and are too "safe" to be able to get fired or moved to a more appropriate position. The parents who do care aren't able to get the help they need for their kids and worst of all there are parents who simply don't care at all. AND saddest of all are the kids who are get caught in the middle of this like an "undertoe" at the ocean. They don't see it coming until they have to sit down for a test and realize that they haven't gotten the full education they need, just "need to know" to get past each test.
The fundamental flaw here is inspiration and how it just isn't present. The good teachers lose it when they don't receive the money, time and support to just teach. The admin don't have it because they are so busy trying to make numbers so they can stay "open for business" and the kids are completely devoid of it since they are too busy trying to cover the curriculum rather than uncover it. It's sad, I don't have the answers because truthfully even if I could attempt to make things right, there will always be those parents who don't care and the guys who are just out to make a buck.

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